Purpose, Mission, Vision, Values & Goals

Purpose, Mission, Vision, Values & Goals
 
The purpose of RLB is to inspire viewers to become impassioned doers.
 
The mission of RLB is to engage, educate, equip, and empower our viewers to love God and love their neighbors through the use of STREAMing media.
 
The vision of RLB is to see entire communities choosing to live life according to their biblical worldview. [2 Timothy 3:16-17 NLT] 
 
RLB values:
 
  • Jesus’ worldview (Colossians 2:8)
  • Transformational change (James 1:22)
  • Co-laboring (1 Corinthians 3:9)
  • Measurable results (Matthew 25:14-30)
  • It is better to give than receive (Acts 20:35)
 
RLB goals:
 
  • expanding reach;
  • engaging new viewers;
  • empower existing viewer relationships;
  • provide media content through purchase, partnership, and production;
  • maintaining state-of-the-art facilities, technologies, and operations;
  • enhancing long-term financial security.

What is STREAM? 

STREAM is a ministry of Radiant Light Broadcasting. It is the collaborative blending of 6 concepts (Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Arts, Math) through the foundation of a biblical worldview.

The Need For A Biblical Worldview Discipleship Ministry

George Barna believes that the proportion of people with a biblical worldview will continue to decline unless churches and families prioritize worldview development, especially among young children.

“The secular worldviews most common in the United States are constantly reinforced by the entertainment media to which people are consistently exposed,” he stated. “To counteract that continual reinforcement of non-biblical principles will require an intentional and strategic effort on the part of Christians – through family, churches, schools, entertainment, and laws – to shift the way Americans think and behave."

A Worldview with Eternal Value

While most people “care deeply about justice for the poor, alleviating hunger and disease, and caring for the environment,” Keller points out that the materialist worldview, which denies an afterlife, seriously diminishes our “motivation to make the world a better place.” Indeed, Keller asks, “Why sacrifice for the needs of others if in the end nothing we do will make any difference?” But a worldview that regards others as made in the image of a good and loving God, and therefore as beings of eternal value, spurs us to practical action in eliminating the misery of our fellow man and woman. What we do to help others now has no expiration date; it counts for eternity as well. 

Obviously, there are people who do not believe in an afterlife who make sacrifices for others. That is not the point. The issue is that their worldview undercuts any coherent reason to do so. The atheist and agnostic bear God’s image as much as anyone else, and so we are not surprised that they sometimes live like the eternal beings they really are, despite what they may claim to believe. Nevertheless, how much greater motivation is there to do the right thing for the right reason! It is no wonder that Christians, who live today in light of eternity, have done more to alleviate the plight of the downtrodden and suffering than any other religion or philosophy ever have done. 

Consider the early Christians, who well understood the connection between time and eternity and lived it out to dramatic effect. What was it about the fledgling Christian movement—reviled, persecuted, outcast, and despised—that triumphed against all odds over mighty pagan Rome, one of the greatest empires in human history? Historians tell us that it was the Christians’ selfless love, pouring themselves out in sacrifice to others. At the root of it all was the specifically Christian vision of the afterlife, which propelled these early believers to put their own lives on the line to minister to their countrymen at great personal cost. They did not fear their own deaths, for they knew something better lay in store for them. To cite but one poignant example, these early followers of Christ risked their own lives to care for their pagan enemies who had contracted infection in a time of plague, when even their own family members cast them into the street to avoid contracting their disease. The self-sacrifice of the early Christians, more than anything, commended Christianity to a culture that found such a lifestyle astonishing and inexplicable apart from a vibrant, living, and eternal hope. -- Alan W Gomes, "40 Questions About Heaven and Hell", page 20. 

What does the Bible say about this cause?

[Colossians 2:6-8 NLT] 6 And now, just as you accepted Christ Jesus as your Lord, you must continue to follow him. 7 Let your roots grow down into him, and let your lives be built on him. Then your faith will grow strong in the truth you were taught, and you will overflow with thankfulness. 8 Don't let anyone capture you with empty philosophies and high-sounding nonsense that come from human thinking and from the spiritual powers of this world, rather than from Christ.

[Joshua 1:8 NLT] 8 Study this Book of Instruction continually. Meditate on it day and night so you will be sure to obey everything written in it. Only then will you prosper and succeed in all you do.

[Romans 12:2 NLT] 2 Don't copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Then you will learn to know God's will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect.

[2 Timothy 3:16-17 NLT] 16 All Scripture is inspired by God and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when we are wrong and teaches us to do what is right. 17 God uses it to prepare and equip his people to do every good work.